An I for an Eye

Ken has been having trouble lately staying under the word limit in Twitter, so he’s decided to write a little front-end program which will take in text and shorten it using a fixed set of abbreviations for commonly used letter sequences. Those abbreviations are shown in the table below:

The character ...

... substitutes for

 

the letter sequence

@

at

&

and

1

one, won

2

to, too, two

4

for, four

b

bea, be, bee

c

sea, see

i

eye

o

oh, owe

r

are

u

you

y

why

Ken is about to start writing this program when he realizes that the extent of his computer knowledge is ... well ... using Twitter. He’s looking for someone to help him – r u [email protected] some1?

Input

Input starts with a single integer $n$ indicating the number of lines of text to process. Following this are $n$ lines of text. Each line will contain only alphanumeric characters and spaces, and each line will have at least one non-space character. Each line has at most $200$ characters.

Output

Display each line with the appropriate substitutions made. Substitutions should also be made inside words, e.g., the word that should be changed to [email protected]. If two letter sequences overlap (like at and to in the word baton) just replace the first one (in this case resulting in [email protected]). If two letter sequences start at the same location (like be and bee in been) replace the longer one (in this case resulting in bn). If the letter sequence starts with an upper-case letter, then the abbreviation should also be in upper-case (if appropriate). Finally, no substituted letter should later be part of another substitution. For example, if the input is oweh, you would first replace the owe with an o to get oh. At this point you do NOT replace the oh with an o since the oh contains a substituted letter.


Sample Input 1 Sample Output 1
3
Oh say can you see
I do not understand why you are so cranky just because Karel won
Formation
O say can u c
I do not underst& y u r so cranky just bcause Krl 1
[email protected]