JMU F17 Regionals Roundup

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2017-11-27 23:00 CET

JMU F17 Regionals Roundup

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2017-12-04 23:00 CET
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Problem G
Haiku Formatting

/problems/haikuformatting/file/statement/en/img-0001.jpg
A haiku is a three-line poem in which the first and third lines contain $5$ syllables each, and the second line contains $7$ syllables.

An example of a haiku is:

Blue Ridge mountain road.
Leaves, glowing in autumn sun,
fall in Virginia.

Write a program to examine a line of English text and and attempt to render it as a haiku. This will require counting the syllables in the words of the text, which should be done according to the following rules:

  • A word consists of a non-empty, maximal string of zero or more alphabetic characters (upper and/or lower-case) followed by zero or more non-blank, non-alphabetic characters.

    • Upper/lower case distinctions are ignored for the purpose of counting syllables, but must be retained in the final output.

    • Non-alphabetic characters are ignored for the purpose of counting syllables, but must be retained in the final output.

  • The characters ‘A’, ‘E’, ‘I’, ‘O’, ‘U’, and ‘Y’ are vowels. All other alphabetic characters are consonants.

    Exceptions to this rule:

    • The character sequence “QU” is considered to be a single consonant.

    • The letter ‘Y’ is considered to be a consonant if it is immediately followed by one of the other vowels.

  • Every word has at least one syllable.

    For example, “Fly”,“I”, “!?”, and “Ssshhh!” are words of one syllable.

  • Each (maximal) string of one or more consonants with at least one vowel to either side indicates a division into separate syllables.

    For example, “strong” has one syllable, “stronger” has $2$, and “bookkeeper” has $3$. “player” has two syllables (because the ‘y’, being followed by an ‘e’, is considered a consonant).

    Exceptions to this rule are:

    • An ‘E’ appearing as the last alphabetic character in a word is silent and should be ignored unless the next-to-last alphabetic character is an ‘L’ and the character immediately before that is another consonant.

      For example, “cake”, “ale” and “pale” have one syllable. “able” has two.

    • An ‘ES’ sequence at the end of the alphabetic sequence in a word does not add a syllable unless immediately preceded by two or more consonants.

      For example, “ales” and “pales” have one syllable. “witches” and “verses” have two.

Input

Input will consist of a single line of text consisting of a sequence of one or more words (as defined above) separated by single blanks.

The total line length will not exceed $200$ characters.

Output

If the words in the input line can be divided into a haiku, then print the haiku as three lines of output.

  • Each line should be left-justified.

  • A single space should separate each pair of words within a line.

  • Upper/lower casing from the input should be preserved.

  • Non-alphabetic characters terminating each word should be preserved.

  • A word cannot be split across multiple lines.

If the words in the input cannot be divided into a haiku, print the line of input with no changes.

Sample Input 1 Sample Output 1
Blue Ridge mountain road. Leaves, glowing in autumn sun, fall in Virginia.
Blue Ridge mountain road.
Leaves, glowing in autumn sun,
fall in Virginia.
Sample Input 2 Sample Output 2
Who would know if we had too few syllables?
Who would know if we had too few syllables?
Sample Input 3 Sample Output 3
International contest- motivation high Programmers have fun!.
International
contest- motivation high
Programmers have fun!.
Sample Input 4 Sample Output 4
Programming contest is stressing us all out. International pain.
Programming contest is stressing us all out. International pain.